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THE SUPERIOR EXPRESS

From our early files

Nuckolls County Courthouse News

Simic Center celebrates 35 years of skating

Masons once again sponsoring CHIP program



From our early files

Eighty Years Ago
The Omaha Bartenders' Union was at work for the passage of a state law which would prohibit women from drinking at bars in Nebraska.
The Nuckolls County Young Republicans Club was organized at a banquet in Nelson.
The first fall meeting of the Methodist Brotherhood was held at Superior's United Methodist Church.
A Superior area farmer reported he had a sure cure for cane, kaffir corn and sudan grass poisoning in livestock. He advised the use of a half pound of Hypo Sulfate mixed with a pint of water to be given as a drench. He claimed it would revive any animal with any sign of life. He passed the recipe along at no charge.
A Ford "T" radiator was $4.98 at the Wall Auto Store, Superior.
The Lyric Theatre was playing "Suzy," starring Jean Harlow and Cary Grant.
Seventy Years Ago
The Union Hotel, Superior, was sold by the Schaer family who built the hotel in 1880.
Albert Ross, 67, died. He was a Superior resident and an employee of the Ideal Cement Company.
The new Hested store opened in Superior.
George Marlett, 78, died. He was a Superior resident and a farmer.
Enamelware percolators were 79 cents at the Superior Hested store.
The Lyric Theatre was playing "To Each His Own," starring Olivia DeHavilland.
Sixty Years Ago
Burglars entered the Chester school and made off with $130 from a safe in the superintendent's office.
Leonard Gharring, 91, died. He had been a Nuckolls County resident since 1888.
Minnie Lynch, 90, died. She was a Hardy resident.
Melvin Struve, 49, died. He was the personnel manager of the Deshler Broom Factory and leader of the Deshler band.
Leaf rakes were 77 cents at Superior's S & A Home and Auto Supply.
The Crest Theatre was showing "The Searchers," starring John Wayne.
Fifty Years Ago
It was the same barber and the same shop in Nelson but prices had changed somewhat. Clarence Cleveland had his hair cut the day of his wedding 50 years earlier, his total bill for a haircut, shampoo, massage, bath and shave was 35 cents. He returned to the same barber, Arlie Tomlinson, and the same shop for his 50th wedding anniversary amda haircut was priced at $1.50.
Mr. and Mrs. C.C. Marr, Superior, celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary.
Marie Latham and Mrs. Frank Brown were honored with 50 year membership pins from the Olive Chapter, Order of the Eastern Star, in Superior.
Guide Rock celebrated the 160th anniversary of the arrival of Zebulon Pike and the lowering of the Spanish flag at the Pawnee village near Guide Rock.
Automobile tune-ups were $4.99 at Superior's Hill Oil Company.
The Crest Theatre was playing "Lt. Robin Crusoe," starring Dick Van Dyke and Nancy Kwan.
Forty Years Ago
Mr. and Mrs. Elza Grove, Cadams, celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary.
The Webber Wide-Awake 4-H Club observed the 50th anniversary of its founding.
Robert Koinzan, 55, died. He was the post master at Davenport.
Ida Meier Hoins, 93, died. She was a Superior resident.
Lucite wall paint was $8.99 per gallon at Mullet's Store in Superior.
The Crest Theatre was playing "The Exorcist."
Thirty Years Ago
A tornado struck the Village of Hardy and caused extensive property damage. Several injuries were reported.
Willard and Nada Springer, Superior, celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary.
Ed and Marie Sekora, Nelson, celebrated their 40th wedding anniversary.
The Ladies Pinochle Club, Ruskin, observed its 10th anniversary.
A 20 pound bag of Nebraska grown red potatoes was one dollar at Superior's Jack and Jill Food Center.
The Crest Theatre was playing "Aliens."
Twenty Years Ago
Farmers Sate Bank, Superior, observed its 80th anniversary.
Stockholders of the Cooperative Business Association approved a 10 year lease of their six area elevators to Land O' Lakes, Inc. Land O' Lakes signed a sub-lease agreement with AGP to manage grain operations. The elevators were located in Superior, Hardy, Byron, Chester, Hubbell and Republic.
Frank Drudik, 87, died. He was a farmer and a lifelong resident of the Nelson community.
Donna Garber Christensen, 66, died. She was a Superior resident.
The Crest Theatre was playing "A Time to Kill" and "A Very Brady Sequel."
Ten Years Ago
Ruskin's Community Center was renovated with funds from a gift from the estate of a former Ruskin resident, Agusta Sykes Zettler.
Some Nuckolls County rural residents were without telephone service for six hours after a farmer struck a Windstream Communications control box with his pickup truck.
Richard Bruening, 98, died. He was a Superior resident.
Richard Hauser, 69, died. He was a lifelong Nelson resident.
The Crest Theatre was playing "The Devil Wears Prada" and "Accepted."
Five Years Ago
The Sedan Road was opened. Two years of road work rebuilt the road to the Sedan elevator.
Nuckolls County Sheriff Jim Marr escaped serious injury when his police vehiclewas struck by an empty south bound semi-truck on Highway 14.
Arne Larsen, Hebron, celebrated his 100th birthday.
Wilma Fringer Smith, 89, died. She was a lifelong resident of the Guide Rock community.
The Crest Theatre was playing "Columbiana" and "Crazy, Stupid Love."
One Year Ago
A Superior resident and a Guide Rock resident were arrested in Superior in connection with a string of vehicle break-ins.
Superior was selected for the pilot America Walks program.
Dean Holman, 93, died. He was a WW11 veteran and a Superior High School graduate.
The City of Superior did not seek a tax increase for 2016.
The Crest Theatre was playing "The Man from U.N.C.L.E."

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Nuckolls County Courthouse News


County Traffic Court
Tammy R. Korb, Superior, violation of stop sign, $75.
Tamara L. Dewees, Hastings, speeding, $25.
Tony J. Dowse, Harvard, speeding, $25.
Diane K. Smith, Omaha, speeding, $75.
Paul A. Rodriguez, Hastings, speeding, $10.
Chandler Franssen, Red Cloud, speeding, $25.
Derita Burris, Superior, impeding traffic, $10.
County Civil Court
Credit Management Services vs. Caren Musser, Nelson, judgment entered.
Credit Management Services vs. Laticia Carter, Superior, judgment entered.
Capital One Bank vs. Tanner Krajnik, Superior, judgment entered.
Professional Choice Recovery, Inc. vs. Hope Ortega, Superior, judgment entered.
County Criminal Court
State of Nebraska vs. Ron S. Gentry, Superior, third degree assault, $100.
State of Nebraska vs. Peggy Foshee, Superior, trespassing, $50.
Marriages
Drew Edward Kohmetscher and Mallory Diane Bush were married on Sept. 8, in Nelson by Diana Wehrman, Nuckolls County clerk magistrate, with John D. Mertens and Lois Kohmetscher as witnesses.
Real Estate Transfers
Donald Moore, Lynsi Towey to Gwendolyn E. Mohler, Mary M. Mohler, Lot 13 in Block 22, Original Town of Superior.
Michael G. Stichka, Connie F. Stichka to Michael G. Stichka, Connie F. Stichka, trustees for the Connie F. Stichka Living Trust, Part of NE14 15-2-5.
Connie F. Stichka, Michael G. Stichka, trustees for the Connie F. Stichka Living Trust to Connie F. Stichka, Michael G. Stichka, Part of NE14 15-2-5.
Michael G. Stichka, Connie F. Stichka to Cooperative Producers, Inc., Part of NE14 15-2-5.
Mandy Falk, attorney-in-fact, Mina Joyce Allgood to William R. Sauce, Elizabeth N. Sauce, Lots 1 and 2 in Block 13, East Superior.
Jessica R. Stokes, Michael A. Stokes to Rebecca S. Engelhardt,Lot 3 and Part Lot 2 in Block 3, First Addition of Lawrence.
Wayne R. Biltoft, Sharon J. Bondegard, David Bondegard, Steven R. Biltoft, Carla Biltoft, Sharlene R. Lemonds to Roger J. Biltoft, Undivided 4/5 interest in NE14 21-3-5.
Roger J. Biltoft, Diane Biltoft, Sharon J. Bondegard, David Bondegard, Steven R. Biltoft, Carla Biltoft, Sharlene R. Lemonds to Wayne R. Biltoft, Undivided 4/5 interest with exception NE14 35-4-5.
Roger J. Biltoft, Diane Biltoft, Wayne R. Biltoft, Sharon J. Bondegard, David Bondegard, Steven R. Biltoft, Carla Biltoft to Sharlene R. Lemonds, Undivided 4/5 interest in part of SE 14 16-3-5; Undivided 4/5 interest in part of SE14 16-3-5; Undivided 4/5 interest with exception SE 14 16-3-5.
Roger J. Biltoft, Diane Biltoft, Wayne R. Biltoft, Sharlene R. Lemonds to Sharon J. Bondegard, Steven R. Biltoft, Undivided 3/5 interest in part of NE14 20-4-5; Undivided 3/5 interest in part of NE14 SE14 20-4-5.
Anthony R. Peters, Cherie L. Peters to Linda Selvage Lot 19 in Block 13, Original Town of Lawrence.
Donald Eugene Shelton to Glen Jochem, Lot 8 in Block 23, East Superior.
Lynette Echter, Gregory Echter to Jeffrey R. Ziegler, Lot 4 and Part Lot 5 in Block 12 and vacated street, Original Town of Ruskin;  Part of NE14 15-2-5; Lot 6 in Block 12, Original Town of Ruskin; Part of NW14 NE14 15-2-5; Part Lot 5 in Block 12, Original Town of Ruskin; Part of NW14 NE14 15-2-5; Part of NE14 15-2-5
Donna Lyn Mosier, personal representative for Marilyn S. Mosier, deceased, to Conna Lyn Mosier, Amy Sue Mosier Bartels, Janet Lea Jones, W12 NE14 17-4-5.

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Simic Center celebrates 35 years of skating
Nearly four decades ago Floyd Butler, a Superior area farmer, was actively working to sell area residents on a vision. A vision he believed would benefit the area's young people. The area had been without a roller skating rink since the Skatemor closed in the 1960s. Butler recalled the fun his children had at the Superior skating rink and on rinks in other communities including the one at Hardy.
Butler began to work tirelessly to sell his vision to the community. He didn't hesitate to share his story and ask for donations. Many of those he talked with caught his vision and remembered good times they had skating at the Skatemor located on South Central.
Among those who bought into the dream was Tony Simic, a bachelor farmer then residing at the Superior Good Samaritan Center. While hundreds of people had donated money, labor and materials before the project was completed, Simic was the largest contributor and the project was named the Simic Recreation Center in his honor.
As the project progressed, other community leaders joined the effort and a board of directors was organized and a non-profit corporation formed.
Board members visited skating rinks and explored construction options with the goal of getting the most for the least invested.
There were many hurdles to overcome.
One of the first involved location.
The goal was to find a central location that Superior residents could walk to. The first choice was City Park but land was not available there. Other proposed locations included land west of Superior High School, and one on East First Street. The owner of that land where Saathoff Construction is now located offered to donate the land, but because of its remote location the donation was declined. Finally, a location was found between the Dairy Queen and the Church of Christ. However, that location was thought to be potentially susceptible to flooding so farmers were enlisted to bring in fill material to raise the building's floor level.
Occasionally, it was necessary to hire professional help but a big share of the construction labor was donated. The goal was to build a structure that would require minimum maintenance and have an interior with few obstructions. The final plan called for the utilization of a steel building framework with concrete block walls lined with foam panels. The fire marshal objected and the foam had to be covered with a fire retardant material.
The goal was to combine fun with physical activity. The original board forbid pinball machines and video games and restricted candy and soft drink sales. The goal was to keep the admission price low, utilize volunteers whenever possible, and give area youngsters the opportunity to enjoy healthy, physical activity.
Though construction was not complete, the rink opened to a more than a capacity crowd on New Year's Eve, 1981.
Much of the interior was finished with materials obtained at builder's surplus stores. For example, freight damaged paint containers of various colors were obtained for $1 a gallon and the paint mixed in plastic barrels before being applied to the walls. Benches were made from damaged laminate countertops and lockers were built utilizing surplus cabinet doors. Hinges and clasps were sorted out of 50-gallon size containers found at an Omaha surplus store.
Construction plans were modified from time to time to utilize the materials available.
After 35 years of use, the rink was showing its age when it closed for the summer of 2016 and so the summer vacation period was used to schedule extensive renovation work.
A partial list of the recent work and donors includes the following:
The inside was painted and new carpet laid. A concrete ramp added to the front of the structure to provide handicap accessibility. The ramp required 11 12 yards of concrete. The owners of Hebron's Quality Concrete and Construction, Terry and Braden Burk, donated their time and labor as well as a portion of the concrete required. Quality Redi-Mix of Superior also donated a portion of the concrete. Gary Hintz, owner of Hintz Backhoe and Trenching, donated the use of equipment and some of the labor.
A portion of the paint used to refresh the rink has been donated by Ace Hardware. Deb Andreasen is lettering the front of the building. She plans on putting the finishing touch on the front in the spring of 2017.
Melissa Bargen held garage sales and donated the proceeds to the association. Ideal Market donated some of the interior signs.
Other projects and renovations during the summer included resurfacing the skating and bathroom floors. Black light posters were added, as well as a new food warmer. The doors, sign and railing were painted.
More work is needed. The association directors would like to replace the bathroom and front entrance doors. Gutters also need to be repaired or replaced.
This year's work would not have been possible without a donation from the late Charlotte Walters as well as the donations from area residents and business firms.
The current manager is Melissa Bargen. Steve Hiatt is association president and Melissa Meyer is the association secretary. Judy Grove is responsible for the treasurer's duties. Other board members are Brian Bargen, Justin Bushnell, Becky Fullerton, Lu Hiatt, Doug Hiatt, Britni Oakman and Shanel Rempe.
A number of people have served as managers over the years. The managers for the last 10 years include Jeromi and Vicky Wagner, Billy and Kassie Hiatt and Melissa Bargen.
The rink holds theme nights once a month. Themes include 80's Night, Blackout Night, Crazy Hat Night, Crazy Sock Night, Country Night, Crazy Hair Night, Hillbilly Night, Hawaiian Night and Sock Hop Dance. Annual parties are held for Halloween, Christmas, New Years, Valentine and St. Patrick's days. Doug Hiatt is the current DJ.
Among the good memories associated with the rink is that of Harry Robinson opening it day after day so walkers would have a dry and warm place inside during the winter months.
Vernon Quy, a retired carpenter and former skating rink manager not only donated his time and skills to building the rink but he was featured on the Johnny Carson television show. Quy modified a pair of skates and added a chain saw motor to create motorized skates. Quy appeared on Carson's show and demonstrated the skates. The appearance was tape recorded by a number of Superior residents.
And we must not forget the volunteer who for years came from Portis to regularly help at the rink.
For more information about the Simic Recreation Association contact Melissa Bargen.

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Masons once again conducting CHIP program
The Nebraska Freemasons Child Identification Program (CHIP) is coming to Superior. Members of the lodge invite children aged 18 and younger to participate in a comprehensive Child Identification Program at Superior High School, Tuesday, from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., Oct. 4. A CD will be provided that includes a brief interview, digital photographs, and digital fingerprints of the child. Professional personnel will make a dental impression with the child and perform a DNA cheek swab. Materials and instructions are also included for the at-home generation of scent pads for canine search and rescue. All materials are given to the parents for safekeeping. Only the permission form is kept on file, and the program is provided at no charge to the participants. The event is being sponsored by the Superior lodge.
The Toothprint impression is a relatively new means of identification where the child bites down on a softened thermoplastic wafer, making a permanent, archival record of their teeth. Toothprints was developed by David Tesini of Massachusetts, a pediatric dentist.
Peter Banks, director of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, was the first to suggest that the saliva on the Toothprint wafers might be a suitable sample for nuclear DNA testing and scent recovery by blood hound recovery dogs; both have been clinically documented. It has been shown that three years after a Toothprinting has been taken, the saliva is still viable for DNA testing. He also stated that, since the Toothprint wafer is sealed in a "zipper"- type plastic bag, enough scent remains for a trained dog to identify and track it. Cheek swabs provide DNA and, when frozen, are stated to last for up to 20 years.
Masonic child identification programs are held periodically throughout Nebraska and may be sponsored by any group but are generally sponsored by local Masonic lodges as part of their community service programs.
Statistics show more than one million children are reported missing in the United States each year, with more than 100,000 attempted abductions by non-family members for the same period.

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