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Special Features Section, Superior Express

Jenny's REESources

Webster County Fair starts next Saturday

 

Jenny's REESources, by Jenny Rees, UNL Extension
I've had a few calls about mosquito control; their numbers are increasing because of the many rain events we've had this year resulting in standing water. Preventing water from standing in containers such as flower pot basins, children's wading pools, bird baths, clogged roof gutters and used tires by draining or rinsing on at least a weekly basis can help. Children's wading pools can be covered.
Products containing Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (BTi) such as Aquabac, Bactimos, Teknar, or Vectobac can also be applied to stagnant water pools to kill mosquito larvae without harming the creatures drinking from these areas. Grassy areas and shrubbery can be sprayed with insecticides containing permethrin or malathion (be sure to check the label for use on the landscape and plants which can be sprayed). Another option is to use personal repellents containing DEET. Other personal repellents contain picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus (PMD), or IR3535.
Mosquito plants also known as citronella plants are advertised as natural repellents; the plants themselves don't repel mosquitoes but the extract from crushed leaves will and these extracts are used in natural personal repellents listed above. For more information, check out our Residential Mosquito Control publication at http://go.unl.edu/3hc6. In the future, I'll share about a recent research study conducted in this area to determine if mosquitoes are greater in gravity or pivot irrigated fields compared to rainfed fields.
University of Nebraska Extension with support of many agri-business groups and Nebraska commodity organizations are working together to present Nebraska Manure Demonstration Day. The 2014 Nebraska Manure Demonstration Day will be held at the Dawson County Fairgrounds on July 29 from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Numerous educational presentations and demonstrations are planned throughout the day. There will be two educational tracks, "Managing What We Can't See in Manure," and "Connecting Manure and Fields." Guests will be able to choose presentations that best fit their needs. Livestock producers, custom applicators, consultants and others interested in learning more about the efficient utilization of manure are encouraged to attend this free event. Agriculture advocate and radio personality Trent Loos along with Greg Ibach, the director of Agriculture in Nebraska will be the keynote speakers. Organizers are taking registrations for the free meal. Register at http://go.unl.edu/nemanuredemo.
The event will focus on the needs of the manure industry in Nebraska. Participants can view demonstrations of the latest manure handling equipment and will have the opportunity to learn from experts about new developments in manure management and handling. Educational topics include, PEDV, mortality composting, composted manures, using manure on crops, and soil health following manure application. Educational events will include opportunities for CCA Credits and NDEQ Land Application Training Recertification. For more information about the 2014 Nebraska Manure Demonstration Day and to register for the free noon meal visit http://go.unl.edu/nemanuredemo.

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Webster County Fair starts next Saturday

The 108th Webster County Fair in Bladen is just around the corner. It begins next Saturday with the annual clean-up at 8 a.m. The livestock portion starts at the fairgrounds rodeo arena with the 4-H and FFA horse show, which gets underway at 10:30 a.m. The first ever open beef barbecue competition is also Saturday, with check-in of teams, procurement of beef for the contest and the start of the preparation and cooking from 5 to 7 p.m.
Another new event this year is the all-faith church service in the open air arena on the rodeo side of the fairgrounds. It starts at 10:30 a.m. Sunday. A potluck or carry in dinner will follow church. A gospel concert will be held in the same area, beginning at 12:30 p.m. Youth activities resume at 3 p.m. when 4-H youths bring their favorite homemade ice cream recipes for a judged "ice cream roll."
Attendees will have an opportunity to help judge the barbecue contest on Sunday. The barbecue teams are competing for the grand prize of a new grill and bragging rights for being the best barbecuers in southcentral Nebraska. Tickets will then be available for a meal, which includes meat from the contest.
The youth portion continues throughout the week with many activities. The 4-H and FFA beef show is split once again this year with beef showmanship beginning Thursday at 1 p.m.
"Webster County is famous for the number and quality of its beef exhibits, and this year is no exception," said Duane Lienemann, Webster County extension educator. "The top two senior and top two intermediate beef showmen will be determined at the Thursday afternoon show, but will come back on Friday morning to compete for grand champion beef showman under a different judge."
The last day of competitions is Saturday, July 26. All exhibits will remain in place until Saturday evening, including static exhibits at the exhibit hall and animals in the livestock barns. All non-auction exhibits will be released at 11 p.m. Saturday or before noon Sunday. Leaders, youths and parents will be back at the fairgrounds Sunday morning to load-out market animals and participate in post-fair clean-up.
4-H and FFA events are only part of the fair. There are open class exhibits, vendor booths and a carnival by Midwest Amusements. The carnival will run Wednesday through Saturday night with armband night on Wednesday. The annual Webster County Rodeo kicks off Thursday, July 24, with a beef barbeque at 5 p.m., followed by a watermelon feed and the rodeo princess contest. The Friday rodeo will be "Tough Enough to Wear Pink" night with a portion of the gate going to fight cancer. It kicks off with a pork barbeque at 5 p.m. and ends with a dance. The rodeo will have its last go-around Saturday evening.

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